KidsWorldMD is adding to its series on prematurity

October 18, 2013   Health News
(PRLEAP.COM) KidsWorldMD is adding to its series on prematurity. Why is prematurity more common in African American mother?

KidsWorldMD.com understands that there are many theories of contributing factors for prematurity, but what causes premature birth is still a mystery. Prematurity can occur even when all precautions are taken. However, there are several risk factors that increase the chance for prematurity of the newborn infant.

It is estimated that at least 10 percent of all babies born in the United States are premature, or born before 37 weeks of gestation, and that number is closer to 17% in African American. For centuries there have been accounts of premature births and in many cases premature deaths. New technologies and more specialized staff have contributed to the higher success rates and outcomes of premature infants. Premature infants have been born to families of all races and all socioeconomic levels, however it is reported to be fifty percent higher in African American women. Why?

KidsWorld has compiled a list of risk factors and although the list is not conclusive there are some stressors that may be more prevalent among African American mothers. Could these stressors be responsible for the higher number of premature births that are reported in African American mothers? http://kidsworldmd.com/blog/newsletters/why-is-premature-birth-more-common-in-african-american/ Research is recommended before any conclusions can be made. However, it is a disturbing statistic and measures need to be taken to reduce prematurity among all ethnic groups.

KidsWorldMD .com invites readers to take the test on multiple births as this is one cause for prematurity. Do you know the average length of the pregnancy for a twin birth? Approximately how many pounds should the expectant mother of twins gain during her pregnancy? http://kidsworldmd.com/inttool_search/ctid/40/cid/MultipleBirthsQuiz

KidsWorldMd is a health information website that addresses common health topics relevant for expectant mothers and children. It is not meant to treat or replace medical interventions.
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